There Are Weirder People, But..

Hi Im Lenny :) live in the Pharcyde (or maybe in New Jersey)
I'm like.. 20-ish years old..
I hope I can keep you interested or something like that .

August 26, 2014 7:46 pm

He’s only 13 😂😂 he got it. He’s gonna go far 🏀🏀🏀🏀 @_thugnificant_

August 23, 2014 5:58 pm
🔴👑⚫

🔴👑⚫

August 15, 2014 9:54 pm 9:53 pm 9:52 pm 9:51 pm

dointimeinchristmas:

James Brown - I Don’t Want Nobody To Give Me Nothing (Open Up The Door I’ll Get It Myself) (1969)

(via blackourstory)

9:51 pm
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

disrespectfuljezebel:

postracialcomments:

whatisthat-velvet:

hussieologist:

nigerianroyal:

hussieologist:

amorenganosa:

dragonsbones:

blacksupervillain:

hussieologist:

hussieologist:

appledoobiewrap the fucking klan is there????

il-tenore-regina
yes. My friends are telling me the klan showed up.

Holy shit

WHAT THE FUCKPLEASE TELL ME THIS ISN’T REALPLEASE

Can any other sources confirm?????
😟

You not gonna see it on the news. Your best bet is to find a video. But good luck. Everything I get is coming straight from people there. My friends and family are there seeing this and sending it to me.

Any updates on the Klan

No. I’ll let u know

Damn, for real????

Ive seen numerous folks saying there were there 
Watch this video

The klan was already there, but they’re wearing police uniforms instead of robes.

^^^^^^^^^^^^

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

disrespectfuljezebel:

postracialcomments:

whatisthat-velvet:

hussieologist:

nigerianroyal:

hussieologist:

amorenganosa:

dragonsbones:

blacksupervillain:

hussieologist:

hussieologist:

appledoobiewrap the fucking klan is there????

il-tenore-regina
yes. My friends are telling me the klan showed up.

Holy shit

WHAT THE FUCK
PLEASE TELL ME THIS ISN’T REAL
PLEASE

Can any other sources confirm?????

😟

You not gonna see it on the news. Your best bet is to find a video. But good luck. Everything I get is coming straight from people there. My friends and family are there seeing this and sending it to me.

Any updates on the Klan

No. I’ll let u know

Damn, for real????

Ive seen numerous folks saying there were there 

Watch this video

The klan was already there, but they’re wearing police uniforms instead of robes.

^^^^^^^^^^^^

(via blackourstory)

9:49 pm
"I’ve told the kids in the ghettos that violence won’t solve their problems, but then they ask me, and rightly so; “Why does the government use massive doses of violence to bring about the change it wants in the world?” After this I knew that I could no longer speak against the violence in the ghettos without also speaking against the violence of my government"

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (via loveinfamine)

Ahem…

(via gradientlair)

"Martin Luther King Jr. was all about peace.  You’re keeping racism alive by not honoring that he was complacent and non-violent." STFU.

(via married2themoon)

(via blackourstory)

9:49 pm 9:47 pm 9:47 pm
woodmeat:

"michelle fuck they talkin bout man, i got the elective waves on deck man. who congress fuckin with? not me"

woodmeat:

"michelle fuck they talkin bout man, i got the elective waves on deck man. who congress fuckin with? not me"

(Source: sebenty, via angryblackman)

9:46 pm
otoso:

Alpha Phi Alpha basketball team on the steps of their fraternity house on Striver’s Row in New York City, circa 1920. By James Van den Zee

otoso:

Alpha Phi Alpha basketball team on the steps of their fraternity house on Striver’s Row in New York City, circa 1920. By James Van den Zee

(via blackourstory)

9:46 pm
profkew:

In 1965, while a college undergraduate, Alabama State Senator Hank Sanders joined Martin Luther King Jr. (center) in the march from Selma to Montgomery ~ Robert Abbott Sengstacke/Getty Images
The New Racism: This is how the civil rights movement ends

Long before he became the most powerful man in the Alabama Senate, before he controlled billions of dollars in state money and had lobbyists, governors, and future presidents seeking his favor, Hank Sanders used newspapers and magazines as bathroom tissue. His mother would collect periodicals from the wealthy white family whose house she cleaned and bring them back for Sanders and his brothers and sisters. There were 13 children, all told, and they lived with their parents in a three-room shack that their father had built out of one-by-eight boards among the tall pines and chinaberry trees in Blacksher, a speck of a town 50 miles north of Mobile.
This was Alabama in the 1950s, when Jim Crow reigned and a governor’s race was determined by which candidate managed to secure the endorsement of the Ku Klux Klan. Life in Baldwin County, where Blacksher was located, may have been marginally less horrid for its black residents than in other parts of the state: The county’s last lynching had occurred in 1919 and some of the white men who perpetrated it had even gone to prison. But there were certain realities by which Sanders, as a black child, knew he must abide. He knew not to spend any of the money he earned picking cotton on the six-ounce bottles of Coca-Cola at the drugstore; those were only for white customers, and a black person who tried to buy one risked more than just being refused service. He also knew not to look in the direction of a white woman. The one time he did, the woman’s male companion threatened to whip him, and probably would have had Sanders’s mother, a strong-willed woman named Ola Mae, not intervened. For Sanders, the fact that there was no electricity or running water in his house—to say nothing of toilet paper—was far less distressing than the constant threat of danger.
In 1954, when Sanders was twelve, he momentarily ignored the intended purpose of a magazine his mother had brought home and instead read an article about Thurgood Marshall’s work on Brown v. Board of Education. The case had no bearing on Sanders’s everyday life. Baldwin County’s schools were segregated and would remain defiantly so for more than a decade after his education in them. But Marshall’s legal heroics wormed their way into the back of Sanders’s mind, and when his seventh-grade teacher asked her students what they wanted to be when they grew up, Sanders surprised himself by saying, “A lawyer.” His classmates—whose professional aspirations tended toward farming or turpentine work—burst out laughing. Sanders began to cry; the other kids laughed even harder, which prompted even more tears. When the episode was finally over, Sanders resolved that he would become a lawyer (still not entirely sure what one was) just to prove his classmates wrong.

profkew:

In 1965, while a college undergraduate, Alabama State Senator Hank Sanders joined Martin Luther King Jr. (center) in the march from Selma to Montgomery ~ Robert Abbott Sengstacke/Getty Images

The New Racism: This is how the civil rights movement ends

Long before he became the most powerful man in the Alabama Senate, before he controlled billions of dollars in state money and had lobbyists, governors, and future presidents seeking his favor, Hank Sanders used newspapers and magazines as bathroom tissue. His mother would collect periodicals from the wealthy white family whose house she cleaned and bring them back for Sanders and his brothers and sisters. There were 13 children, all told, and they lived with their parents in a three-room shack that their father had built out of one-by-eight boards among the tall pines and chinaberry trees in Blacksher, a speck of a town 50 miles north of Mobile.

This was Alabama in the 1950s, when Jim Crow reigned and a governor’s race was determined by which candidate managed to secure the endorsement of the Ku Klux Klan. Life in Baldwin County, where Blacksher was located, may have been marginally less horrid for its black residents than in other parts of the state: The county’s last lynching had occurred in 1919 and some of the white men who perpetrated it had even gone to prison. But there were certain realities by which Sanders, as a black child, knew he must abide. He knew not to spend any of the money he earned picking cotton on the six-ounce bottles of Coca-Cola at the drugstore; those were only for white customers, and a black person who tried to buy one risked more than just being refused service. He also knew not to look in the direction of a white woman. The one time he did, the woman’s male companion threatened to whip him, and probably would have had Sanders’s mother, a strong-willed woman named Ola Mae, not intervened. For Sanders, the fact that there was no electricity or running water in his houseto say nothing of toilet paperwas far less distressing than the constant threat of danger.

In 1954, when Sanders was twelve, he momentarily ignored the intended purpose of a magazine his mother had brought home and instead read an article about Thurgood Marshall’s work on Brown v. Board of Education. The case had no bearing on Sanders’s everyday life. Baldwin County’s schools were segregated and would remain defiantly so for more than a decade after his education in them. But Marshall’s legal heroics wormed their way into the back of Sanders’s mind, and when his seventh-grade teacher asked her students what they wanted to be when they grew up, Sanders surprised himself by saying, “A lawyer.” His classmateswhose professional aspirations tended toward farming or turpentine workburst out laughing. Sanders began to cry; the other kids laughed even harder, which prompted even more tears. When the episode was finally over, Sanders resolved that he would become a lawyer (still not entirely sure what one was) just to prove his classmates wrong.

(via blackourstory)